THE LIL’ INNOVATORS
OF EAST YORK PRESENT

THE LIL’ INNOVATORS
OF EAST YORK PRESENT
The Video

Why a Rain Garden?


This landscaped shallow depression is filled in with loose, deep soil that naturally filters storm water and prevents it from entering our waterways. A rain garden is low maintenance and planted with beautiful, hardy native plants that attract pollinators and requires little to no watering. By adopting a rain garden, the risk of overland flooding in a person’s basement is significantly reduced. Rain gardens continue to be one of the most cost-effective, low-impact development strategies that combats the effects of climate change and builds in resiliency for cities.

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Build It and Rain Will Come


If you plan it out well, your rain garden can be built over a weekend.
Here’s the skinny:

1. Get your rain garden manual here - this helps you size up the kind of stormwater landscaping you want for your home.
Toronto and Region Conservation Authority

2. Call before your dig - make sure there’s no underground infrastructure (gas, water, telecommunications).
Ontario One Call

3. Have peace of mind: you’ve now got biodiversity, resiliency, and beauty - you're connected to nature!
Homegrown National Park Project

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Media


Did You Know?


Pollinator curb appeal

VIEW DIY POLLINATOR HOUSE GUIDES

Courtyard of the future

View the concept design

Our Mission


The Rain Gardens United initiative was made possible by being awarded the Toronto Foundation's 2015 Vital Innovation grant.

ORIGIN

Formerly known as the Rain Gardens of Danforth East Village – East York pilot project, we proposed a green corridor to connect Wards 29, 30, 31, and 32 with the Leslie Spit and “carpet” this part of Toronto with butterfly, bee and bird friendly habitat.

ASPIRATION

Our goals include community-building, idea-sharing, and life-enhancing strategies that improve the quality of life for the citizens of Toronto. And this includes recognizing the rain gardens' capability to protect our precious freshwater in Lake Ontario.

ENDGAME

If we can inspire others to start building rain gardens across Toronto, we can convince the City to develop a program akin to the current basement flooding protection subsidy. We aim to bring together stakeholders who prioritize the implementation of climate change adaptation strategies now.

About Us


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YAMAGUCHI
IN THE GARDEN OF RAIN

Yamaguchi attended a workshop at a Toronto public library run by the TRCA and learned how to build a rain garden. He then applied for a $10,000 grant from the Toronto Foundation for a pilot project, the Rain Gardens of Danforth East Village-East York, to install 10 rain gardens in the east end. Now, there are fourteen in all in the area. It began with a demonstration at his house. – Muriel Draaisma, CBC News

Yamaguchi is a proud East Yorker, a hands-on Homegrown National Park Ranger, and a devoted family guy. He's also a college English teacher by trade and busy completing his Masters of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication (MAEEC, fall 2017) at Royal Roads University's School of Environment and Sustainability.

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